ROB ZOMBIE’s Third ‘Amdro Ant Block’ Commercial Posted Online

Rocker-turned-filmmaker Rob Zombie adds another Amdro Ant Block commercial to his belt. Enjoy this one as yet again ants send someone one step closer to the edge of the cliff.

This Zombie-directed slice of horrific wit has fun with the children’s song “The Ants Go Marching”. As only Zombie can, he conjures a situation where a woman is driven so crazy by the presence of ants that she becomes overwhelmed with the uncontrollable urge to, well, go crazy and kill.

Thankfully, there’s Amdro which, because it annihilates ants, can return even the craziest person to a state of calm.

In a recent interview with Noisecreep, Zombie said, “The television commercial world pretty much works like the film world in the sense that the way you get work a lot of the time is by ad agencies seeing something else you’ve done and then approaching you to do something else.

He added, “Commercials aren’t something that I really think about it, unless I’m working on a specific project. Commercial opportunities have just come in from out of the blue. But I will say that I do watch television commercials differently now that I’m directing them. You start seeing them with a technical eye. I’ve actually had to turn down some commercial stuff because of timing and schedule issues. What I’ve liked the most about working on these commercials has been the fact that I get to ‘direct’ more. Meaning, feature-length films take a long time, so I don’t get to do too much other directing with everything else I have going on. With these commercials, I can knock them out in one or two days and still get to keep my directing chops up.”

Asked what he thinks the main differences are, artistically speaking, between the cinema and commercial worlds are, Zombie said, “When you’re making a movie, it’s your baby from the ground up. With a commercial, you’re being hired to make this thing to sell their product. We’re talking about companies that have been selling their products for decades. Who am I to come in and tell them how to do that? You just don’t know the demographics behind the kinds of people these companies want to reach. At the same time, I don’t just want to come in as just another director they hired. I want to bring in my own lighting guy, art director, set designer and all of that stuff. The companies that have hired me have been cool about that, but I don’t see why they wouldn’t be. It’s like, if they are hiring me, the only way I can guarantee to deliver what they want is to have my crew of people working with me. If I’m surrounded by a crew of people that I don’t know, or feel comfortable with, it would kind of be like getting on stage with some musicians I just met. There’s no way I could guarantee that the show would be that good.”

 

 

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