RUSH Frontman Says New Album Should Arrive Next Spring

Earlier this week, Andy Greene of RollingStone.com conducted an interview with bassist/vocalist Geddy Lee of Canadian rock legends RUSH. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

RollingStone.com: What’s the status of the next album?

Geddy: We’re almost finished writing. We wound the machine back up about three weeks ago. After a sluggish start, we’ve had a very fruitful couple of weeks in terms of writing. I’m very pleased with the direction that the material has taken. And I think we have one or two more songs that we’d like to write, and then we’ll start recording in earnest. Hopefully we’ll have all of the recording done before Christmas. Then we’ll mix it some time in the next year, and then get it out.

RollingStone.com: Wow. So it’ll be out sometime early next year?

Geddy: Yeah. I hope it’ll be out by the spring anyway.

RollingStone.com: Is the sound of the album similar to “Snakes Arrows”?

Geddy: I think it’s a little different than “Snakes Arrows”. It’s not finished so it’s hard to say exactly what it will sound like in totality, but I think that the direction of “Caravan” and “BU2B” sort of points in the direction that we’re going.

RollingStone.com: With a new album in the spring, will you be touring in the summer?

Geddy: Well, there will be a tour. I can’t tell you exactly when. Maybe the summer or maybe the fall. We need some time to organize all that, but we have started to do that at the same time. But yes, there will be a follow-up tour to support the record.

RollingStone.com: I think back to the late 1990s and early 2000s when there was essentially no RUSH. It would have been hard to imagine that a decade was coming with so much activity.

Geddy: I think that it’s a good time for us right now. We feel invigorated by the success of the band. We feel invigorated by the quality of the material that we seem to be able to write. Frankly, I think we’ve come to a point in our lives where we feel like we’re playing the best we’ve ever played as a live band. You don’t know how long that’s going to go. Rock and roll does have its limits as far as the aging process. You want to go out there and play while you’re at your peak, right? I think that’s encouraging us to keep going out on the road — to maximize the playing at the moment.

Read the entire interview from RollingStone.com.

 

Comment